Northern Shade Gardening

Double Bloodroot and Glory of the Snow

Sunday, June 2, 2013 Category: Bulbs,Perennials
white double flowering bloodroot and bluish purple glory of the snow

white double flowering bloodroot and bluish purple glory of the snow

The pretty blue Chionodoxa forbesii (glory of the snow) bulbs  and the pure white Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex (double flowering bloodroot) make gorgeous companions for each other. I planted the Chionodoxa around the Sanguinaria last fall, and now this spring the pretty bluish purple flowers help show off the white blooms of the bloodroot.

double flowering Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex flowers

double flowering Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex flowers

This garden area has both the single and double flowering Sanguinaria canadensis I haven’t seen any of the single flowering ones this year, however the double flowering f. multiplex seem to be spreading well and there are many more of them blooming. These perennials are so beautiful that I’m very glad the rhizomes are multiplying. The double bloodroot must enjoy the position under the willow, with all of the bits of tree leaves, twigs, and other organic matter that they get to grow in, since they are a woodland perennial of Eastern Canada. These flowers handle a great deal of shade, as the willow has leafed out now, so there is very little direct sun here. This garden section is on the north side of a fence, so the plants might get a bit of low sun first thing in the morning, but mostly it’s shade.

white bloodroot and purple blue glory of the snow flowers

white bloodroot and purple blue glory of the snow flowers

I hope some single flowering forms have survived, as the pollinators would miss the single flowering Sanguinaria, since the doubles do not have reproductive parts. The doubles have longer lasting flowers, and a more beautiful form than the singles, but I like to share the garden with the insect visitors, too. In the picture above, you can see another bloodroot folded leaf emerging on the lower left. Soon, it will be revealing an exquisite white bloom.

Sangiuinaria canadensis f. multiplex small bud emerging

Sangiuinaria canadensis f. multiplex small bud emerging

When the flower buds first emerge, the closed white petals are wrapped tightly in a leaf. Then both unfold and the leaf grows fairly large after the white petals drop. You can see a new bud rising up in the front of the picture still mostly protected by the wrap around leaf. On the upper  right is the next stage with the flower popping out of the leaf. On the upper left is a more mature flower, fully open and sitting above the leaf. Once the flower opens fully, it remind me of a water lily sitting above the leaf. Eventually the leaf opens completely, close to the ground, and gets fairly large. The plants make an attractive groundcover for the rest of the summer.

white bloodroot flower emerging from leaf

white bloodroot flower emerging from leaf

The bloodroot flowers have been emerging in waves, so the display has lasted a while. The double flowering bloodroot tend to bloom longer than the singles anyway, but with the staggered emergence, there are new flowers to spy everyday.

white Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex flowers in front of Chionodoxa forbesii

white Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex flowers in front of Chionodoxa forbesii

Chionodoxa forbesii (glory of the snow) are one of my favourite bulbs. These were added to surround the Sanguinaria last fall, and the two flowers compliment each other.

white Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and blue Chionodoxa forbesii bulbs

white Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and blue Chionodoxa forbesii bulbs

I planted the Chionodoxa all around the Sanguinaria group, so all the bloodroot plants would get partners. So far there have been a couple dozen bloodroot flowers, and most of them have a group of pretty glory of the snow flowers to accompany them, lean on them, and twine around them.

spring flowering Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and Chionodoxa forbesii

spring flowering Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and Chionodoxa forbesii

Those Sanguinaria leaves will grow large enough to form an almost solid mat of leaves, and cover the decaying bulb foliage from the Chionodoxa after the bulbs finish blooming. The leaves have a thick texture, with rounded deeply cut lobes. The solid mat of foliage they make for summer means that few weeds will grow here.

Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and Chionodoxa forbesii

Sanguinaria canadensis f. multiplex and Chionodoxa forbesii

If you’re looking for a partner for your Sanguinaria canadensis, I can recommend some Chionodoxa bulbs to highlight the pretty white blooms.

 

 

 

18 Responses to “Double Bloodroot and Glory of the Snow” »

  1. Marit :
    June 3, 2013 at 12:02 am

    The double Bloodroot and Choinodoxa looks very nice together. My double bloodroot nearly disappeared this spring. Perhaps it was because of the very cold winter we had. But the single form has doubled their numbers. They are much easier to grow.
    Beautiful pictures!

  2. Mariana :
    June 3, 2013 at 4:46 am

    Har i flera år tänkt köpa denna skönhet!
    Dom är så vackra!!!!!
    Hälsningar
    Mariana

  3. Northern Shade :
    June 3, 2013 at 6:08 am

    Marit, for some reason this spring all of my single flowering forms seem to have disappeared, and I only have the double flowering ones, but the doubles have spread and have quite a few flowers.

    Mariana, they are very beautiful. The bloodroot are worth growing, even if they are somewhat short in their flowering time. I have some Brunnera macrophylla (Siberian bugloss) planted in front of them to flower after they are done.

  4. Ray :
    June 3, 2013 at 9:13 pm

    Thanks for introducing these. I am most unfamiliar with some of the spring bulbs you have been featuring. I just looked through the Sheeper’s catalog that recently arrived and find some of your beauties in there.

  5. Northern Shade :
    June 3, 2013 at 9:27 pm

    Ray, the double bloodroot are very attractive in the garden, and I don’t know why it took me a while to figure out to plant the glory of the snow bulbs with them, since they flower at the same time.

  6. Garden Ms. S :
    June 4, 2013 at 1:09 pm

    They make a sweet pairing. I absolutely love the leaves of the bloodroot. They complement the bloom perfectly and probably look very nice on thier own later.

  7. Marie :
    June 4, 2013 at 2:31 pm

    Very nice photos of beautiful flowers :)

  8. Northern Shade :
    June 4, 2013 at 4:14 pm

    Ms. S, the leaves later develop to a good size for such small flowers, and they look good here until the fall. They aren’t ephemeral in my garden the way many spring flowers can be. There are some Astilbe next to them, and the finely cut foliage looks good next to these broad leaves.

    Marie, I find the double bloodroot flowers to be exquisite with their rings of pure white petals.

  9. Grace Peterson :
    June 4, 2013 at 5:10 pm

    What a perfect combination. I don’t think I could have planned something like this. I am very impressed! Gorgeous photos.

  10. Northern Shade :
    June 4, 2013 at 7:48 pm

    Grace, I like the little blue stars with the white centres next to the all white bloodroot.

  11. Rose :
    June 7, 2013 at 6:44 am

    A lovely combination! I have some Chionodoxa, but have never grown bloodroot. You’ve given me yet another idea for spring bloomers for next year.

  12. Northern Shade :
    June 7, 2013 at 7:45 am

    Rose,I’ve really enjoyed these two flowers together. They only flower for a few weeks, but are well worth the space in the garden.

  13. Kim :
    June 13, 2013 at 9:16 pm

    Thanks for these pics! I saw double bloodroot at Reader Rock garden here in Calgary and didn’t know what they were, and now I do thanks to your post. It’s a beautiful glowing white flower and I love how the leaf wraps around it. The touch of purple on the leaves is also beautiful. The reference to a water lily, in miniature form, is right on the money, thought the same thing. Nice.

  14. Northern Shade :
    June 13, 2013 at 11:35 pm

    Kim, I like how luminous the bloodroot flowers look. I will have to check out Reader Rock garden next time I’m in Calgary.

  15. Herb :
    June 21, 2013 at 1:53 am

    I would echo the above comments and say that I find both the leaves and the flowers of the double bloodroot quite striking. There is a space under our maple tree in Guelph, Ontario where very little grows. Brunnera seems to be the only plant that is able to survive the conditions. Do you think that the double bloodroot could grow there? In the early spring it gets some sunlight, but in the summer after the leaves on the maple are fully developed there is dense shade and it can become quite dry.

  16. Northern Shade :
    June 21, 2013 at 7:32 am

    Herb, I think that the bloodroot would do well. Mine are planted under the edge of a willow tree, so it is very shady and dry, too. I do give it some supplemental water. The site get a small amount of sun in the early morning when the angle is very low, but then it is in shade for the day. I have some Brunnera here, too, as well as Pulmonaria (lungwort), Asarum europaeum (wild ginger), Actaea (bugbane), Polygonatum (solomon’s seal) and Athyrium filix-femina (lady fern).

  17. PlantPostings :
    June 25, 2013 at 7:17 pm

    Good to know! That’s a beautiful combination! Bloodroot is one of my all-time favorite plants, but it blooms here sometime between late March and early May. The doubles are delightful! I only have the singles–the grow wild in the woods behind my house.

  18. Northern Shade :
    June 25, 2013 at 10:28 pm

    Plant Postings, the woods behind your house must look great in spring when the bloodroot blooms. I used to have both the singles and doubles, but this year only the doubles seem to have returned, and they’ve spread as well.

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